South West Georgia Public Health


Health Departments

Colquitt County - Enviromental Health

Environmental Health

Mission

Provide primary prevention through a combination of surveillance, education, enforcement, and assessment programs designed to identify, prevent and abate the environmental conditions that adversely impact human health.

Food Service Rules and Documents

Note: Adobe Reader is required to view these documents.

NEW Food Service Rules and Regulations (511-6-1) Effective 11/1/2015 Rule Changes/Additions – Summary Brochure

Manuals:

Design, Installation and Construction Foodborne Illness Investigation Interpretation (Public Health Reasons)

Permit/Variance Applications:

Establishment/Mobile Food Service Operations Mobile-Extended Food Service Temporary Food Service Organizer Application Temporary Food Service Vendor Application Variance & Waiver InfoRequest Form

Employee Health Information:

FDA Employee Health and Personal Hygiene Handbook Norovirus: Facts for Foodhandlers and General Public Prevention: EnglishSpanish EPA Approved Disinfectants Employee Health – Red Book Employee Illness – Quick Decision Guide (Non-HSP) Employee Illness – Quick Decision Guide (HSP) Employee Illness Interview Employee Medical Clearance Forms Employee Medical Referral Employee Health Information Employee Reporting Agreement Food & Water Illness Complaint Vomiting/Diarrhea Clean-up Poster Note: Any equipment used for clean-up of vomit/diarrhea must be discarded.

Environmental Health Inspections

Food Service, Hotel/Motel Inspection Search Tool

Click on a county name to view inspections.

Scores and inspections are available through an online, state-wide data management system. * = data available through individual county system.

Appling
Atkinson
Bacon
Baker
Baldwin
Banks
Barrow*
Bartow
Ben Hill
Berrien
Bibb
Bleckley
Brantley
Brooks
Bryan
Bulloch
Burke
Butts
Calhoun
Camden
Candler
Carroll
Catoosa
Charlton
Chatham
Chattahoochee
Chattooga
Cherokee
Clarke*
Clay
Clayton
Clinch
Cobb
Coffee
Colquitt
Columbia
Cook
Coweta
Crawford
Crisp
Dade
Dawson
Decatur
DeKalb*
Dodge
Dooly
Dougherty
Douglas
Early
Echols
Effingham
Elbert*
Emanuel
Evans
Fannin
Fayette
Floyd
Forsyth
Franklin
Fulton
Gilmer
Glascock
Glynn
Gordon
Grady
Greene*
Gwinnett*
Habersham
Hall
Hancock
Haralson
Harris*
Hart
Heard
Henry
Houston
Irwin
Jackson*
Jasper
Jeff Davis
Jefferson
Jenkins
Johnson
Jones
Lamar
Lanier
Laurens
Lee
Liberty
Lincoln
Long
Lowndes
Lumpkin
Macon
Madison*
Marion
McDuffie
McIntosh
Meriwether
Miller
Mitchell
Monroe
Montgomery
Morgan*
Murray
Muscogee
Newton
Oconee*
Oglethorpe*
Paulding
Peach
Pickens
Pierce
Pike
Polk
Pulaski
Putnam
Quitman
Rabun
Randolph
Richmond
Rockdale
Schley
Screven
Seminole
Spalding
Stephens
Stewart
Sumter
Talbot
Taliaferro
Tattnall
Taylor
Telfair
Terrell
Thomas
Tift
Toombs
Towns
Treutlen
Troup
Turner
Twiggs
Union
Upson
Walker
Walton*
Ware
Warren
Washington
Wayne
Webster
Wheeler
White
Whitfield
Wilcox
Wilkes
Wilkinson
Worth

Environmental Health Emergency Preparedness

Mission

Rapidly respond to public health emergencies through assessment and reduction of environmental health threats to human health.

Important Links

Environmental Health Emergency Response Manual Environmental Health Training in Emergency Response (CDC’s EHTER) Flood – Cleanup Guide Flood – Prevent Potential Health Problems Food – Safety Tips for Snow Storm Affected Areas (USDA) Food – Safety Tips During Power Outages (USDA) Georgia Emergency Management Agency (GEMA) Incident Command System (ICS) Resource Center (FEMA) Mold Prevention After a Disaster (YouTube Video) Water Interruption Brochure

Program Goals

  • Prevent communicable disease and contamination of food and water.
  • Develop and monitor environmental health information.
  • Inspect and control sanitation measures.
  • Ensure safe water and wastewater disposal.
  • Control disease vectors and potential epidemics.
  • Facilitate laboratory testing of food and water.
  • Inspect facilities and shelters.

Hotels, Motels and Campgrounds

Mission

Minimize illnesses and injuries associated with insanitary or hazardous conditions in Georgia’s tourist accommodations.

Program Activities:

  • Conduct complaint investigations on insanitary conditions reported by tourists and travelers.
  • Provide education and training for environmental health specialists, consumers and industry professionals on the rules and regulations.
  • Perform mandated inspections of all regulated tourist accommodations.

Rules and Regulations

Owner/Operator Resources:

Application Gas-Fired Equipment Form Plan Review Checklist

Plan Review Submission Instructions Public Benefits Affidavit

Rules and Regulations Well Water Info

Additional Information:

Bedbug Handbook

Bedbug Resources

Official Georgia Code Title 31, Chapter 28. Tourist Courts

Tourist Accommodations Rules and Regulations

Tourist Accomodations Rules and Regulations

(Effective January 1, 2014)

Inspection Report Inspection Guidance Instructions Inspection Marking Instructions Frequently Asked QuestionsInformational Brochure

Pools

Mission

Minimize illnesses and injuries associated with contaminated or hazardous conditions in or around swimming pools.

Program Goals

  • Reduce substantial health hazards and other risk factors that lead to illness or injury through training and enforcement.
  • Conduct compliant investigations associated with swimming pools, spas and recreational waterparks.
  • Perform compliance inspections on all regulated facilities to ensure adherence to design, operation and maintenance rules.

Rules and Regulations (511-3-5)

Map of Counties With/Without State Regulations

Pool Owner/Operator Resources:

Additional Resources

Rabies

What is rabies?

Rabies is a viral disease of mammals, usually occurring among wild animals such as raccoons, skunks, bats, and foxes. The rabies virus travels from the site of the bite up through the nerves until it reaches the brain, causing encephalopathy and ultimately death. So, don’t pet racoons – like this person is doing………►

Which animals carry rabies?

In the United States, rabies occurs primarily in wild mammals (e.g., skunks, raccoons, coyotes, foxes and bats). Sometimes, these wild animals infect domestic cats, dogs, and livestock. Rabies is rare in small rodents such as squirrels, rabbits, beavers, chipmunks, rats and mice, muskrats, hamsters, gerbils, porcupines and guinea pigs.

How is the rabies virus spread?

When an infected animal bites another animal the rabies virus is transmitted in the infected animal’s saliva. Rarely, rabies is spread when infectious material from a rabid animal, such as saliva, comes into contact with mucus membranes such as the eyes, nose, mouth, or a wound.

What are the symptoms of rabies?

Early symptoms of rabies in humans are non-specific and may include fever, headache, and general malaise. Later, signs of encephalopathy such as insomnia, anxiety, confusion, paralysis, excitation, hallucinations, agitation, hypersalivation, difficulty swallowing, and hydrophobia (fear of water) may appear. Death usually occurs within days of the onset of symptoms.

It is a misconception that rabid animals are spotted easily because they drool and foam at the mouth.

These symptoms may never occur or may occur only at the very last stages of the disease. Any non-domesticated or stray animal that acts abnormal should be suspected of having rabies. Rabid animals may stagger, appear restless, be aggressive, have difficulty walking, seem overly friendly, or appear to be choking.

How soon do symptoms appear after exposure?

The length of time between the bite and the symptoms of rabies depends on the strain of rabies virus, how much rabies virus was introduced into the wound, and the distance from the site of the bite to the brain. Usually, the incubation period is quite long and may be one to three months.

What is the treatment for rabies?

There is no known, effective treatment for rabies once the symptoms of the illness have developed. Rabies can be prevented in humans if medical care is sought soon after an exposure to the rabies virus. If left untreated, rabies is always deadly.

How can rabies be prevented?

Make certain that all owned dogs and cats are regularly vaccinated for rabies by a veterinarian. Teach children not to approach or play with wild or stray domestic animals of any kind. Tell them that even though a baby skunk or raccoon may look cute, it can spread very serious diseases. Love your own, leave other animals alone is a good principle for children to learn.

The rabies pre-exposure vaccine regimen is recommended for persons such as rabies research and laboratory workers, spelunkers, veterinarians, veterinary technicians, veterinary students, kennel workers, animal control and wildlife personnel, and taxidermists.

People traveling to parts of the world where canine rabies is endemic should also consider the vaccine.

What should be done when a potentially rabid animal bites someone?

Thoroughly clean the wound immediately with soap and water to reduce the likelihood of rabies transmission. Call your doctor as soon as possible for advice. Your doctor can consult with the Georgia Poison Center (404-616-9000 in Atlanta, or 800-282-5846 statewide) to decide whether postexposure human rabies immune globulin (HRIG) and vaccine are recommended for this bite. Your doctor can also tell you if you need a tetanus booster or antibiotics. Provide your doctor with the following information:

  1. Type of animal involved (pet or wild animal)
  2. Provoked (teased, startled, run past, etc.) or unprovoked attack
  3. Type of exposure (cut, scratch, licking of an open wound), part of the body, number of exposures
  4. Animal’s vaccination status (does not apply to wild animals)
  5. Sick or well animal, type of symptoms
  6. Animal available/not available for testing or quarantine

Under certain circumstances a domestic animal may be placed under quarantine and observed to see if it develops symptoms of rabies. Cats, dogs, and ferrets will become ill and expire within days of shedding the rabies virus in their saliva (the time of the bite).

Where can I get additional information about rabies?

Click here for the GA Rabies Manual and additional GDPH documents. The Georgia Poison Center is available for rabies consultation 24 hours a day, seven days a week: Atlanta 404-616-9000, statewide 800-282-5846

Wastewater Management

Septic Tanks, On-Site Sewage, Portable Toilets

Wastewater Rules and Regulations

Portable Toilets:

Rules and Regulations

Septic Tanks:

Rules and Regulations Manual (updated Jan, 2016) Technical reference guide for the siting, design, permitting, inspecting, and trouble-shooting of residential septic tanks.

Certified Lists

Septic Tank Installers Septic Tank Pumpers Portable Sanitation Pumpers Soil Classifiers

Homeowner Resources

Buying additives/chemicals for your tank? Think again! Guide to Septic Tanks Videos: Understanding Your Septic Tank The Septic System Challenge

Contractor Renewals

* Septic Tank Installers and Pumpers * Soil Classifiers * Portable Sanitation Providers

Contractor/Environmentalist Resources

Applications and Study Guides Committees (Certification Review, Soil Classifiers, Technical Review) Education and Training Courses Manual for Onsite Portable Toilets – Requirements Brochure Product Approvals Residency Verification Form Rules and Regulations Soil Classifier Info Variance/Waiver Request Form and Instructions

Additional Information

Background and Use of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems in GA Design Criteria for Peak Sewage Flow Impact of Onsite Sewage Systems on Ground Water Nitrogen Program Responsibilities

Applications and Study Guides

Applications:

Contractors (installers & pumpers)

Companies

Geologists (editable Word version) Engineers (editable Word version) Soil Classifiers (editable Word version)

Additional Soil Classifier Info

Verification of Residency Form – Contractors Verification of Residency Form – Soil Classifiers

* Required for all individuals holding a state certification

EHS Registration/Onsite Certification EHS Update Form (name and/or contact info change)

Click here and here to enter information in electronically.

Study Guides:

Please call your County or District Envrionmental Health Office to schedule an exam.

Portable Sanitation

Septic Tank Installation:

Commercial Drip Emitter System Mound and Area Fill Residential (also used for the Soil Classifier DPH Rules and Regs test)

Septic Tank Septage Removal and Disposal

Additional Soil Classifier Info

Well Water

Mission

Minimize water-related illnesses in non-public wells.

Information and Services

The Non-Public Well Program (NPW), housed in the State Environmental Health Office, provides a resource for information on wells ranging from installation of new wells, maintenance of wells and wellhead protection, sampling recommendations, to the proper abandonment of wells. In addition, the NPW Program provides assistance and guidance on compliance with rules and regulations for Non-Public Wells. The NPW Program also examines waterborne illness and outbreaks and is available to assist State and Local partners with waterborne disease outbreak investigations. Services provided by the NPW Program also include conducting environmental assessments during outbreak investigations of small water supplies, restaurants, tourist courts, and swimming pools.

Program Goals

  • Provide education, training and guidance related to well installation, protection, evaluation, chlorination, sampling and abandonment.
  • Provide technical assistance and support to local partners regarding enforcement of the Well Water Standards Act.
  • Assist in waterborne disease outbreak investigations.

The Non-Public Well Program is focused on small, private well water supplies.

More Information:

Individual Wells Commercial Wells Waterborne Diseases and Outbreak Info

Helpful Links

Georgia Environmental Protection Division

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Storm Relief Information - Click Here

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